Insights

Why you should never use LinkedIn’s default connection reques

A key element of the enormous value of LinkedIn is that it provides you with a platform for a targeted job search.

Ten years ago, it was much, much harder to find people who were working for your dream employer.

Today, you can find those people in a few seconds. LinkedIn gives you a means to contact them and begin to build a professional relationship.

But…you realise you’re not the only person who’s going to be contacting them, don’t you?

You realise they’re probably getting connection requests every day, right?

Especially if they work for a great company that lots of people would like to work for.

So it’s vital that your approach is as professional and engaging as possible.

How to uncover the hidden job market using LinkedIn

Why does an executive recruiter like me write a book telling people how to “uncover the hidden job market” for themselves?

For two reasons.

One, I genuinely want to serve people. I’m very aware that recruitment is not well respected as an industry. Often, when I tell people I’m a recruiter, they can’t wait to share some awful experience they’ve had.

So I want to show that many recruiters are in fact caring professionals who treat clients and candidates with respect and integrity.

Two, I’m very aware that most people will not find their next role via a recruiter, even a good one.

That’s because only a small percentage of jobs are actually filled by recruiters.

How to Uncover the Hidden Job Market Using LinkedIn

Businessman using binoculars, people portraits in the lens

Why does an executive recruiter like me write a book telling people how to “uncover the hidden job market” for themselves?

For two reasons.

One, I genuinely want to serve people. I’m very aware that recruitment is not well respected as an industry. Often, when I tell people I’m a recruiter, they can’t wait to share some awful experience they’ve had.

So I want to show that many recruiters are in fact caring professionals who treat clients and candidates with respect and integrity.

LinkedIn can build your confidence for job searching

girl power super heroI am frequently speaking with people who are not currently employed.

Their current situation has come about for all sorts of reasons.

They may have been made redundant due to a contracting industry, difficult economic conditions or a company failure.

They may have taken a voluntary redundancy, sometimes cashing in a payout to fund a new business.

They might have had to relocate for family reasons, away from their previous employer.

They may have been terminated. Hey, it’s happened to me and, truth be told, it’s happened to plenty of people.

Endorsements Rule!

ENDORSEDWhy you should be Endorsing people on LinkedIn

I’ve talked a lot about search-optimising your profile recently, and in my last article I mentioned the area of LinkedIn Endorsements.

I understand that many people don’t like these Endorsements, mainly because anyone who is connected to you can endorse you for a skill.

Regardless of whether they’ve ever worked with you or you’ve done work for them.

That does seem to devalue the whole thing.

But I’ve actually changed my mind about the overall value of Endorsements.

And I want to encourage you to give them.

Why I rank No. 1 in Australia on LinkedIn

number 1In my previous article, I wrote about how to search-optimise your LinkedIn profile, to make sure you are found when recruiters are searching to fill an unadvertised role.

I want to give you an example of this in action, so you can understand how to apply these principles for yourself.

If you search on LinkedIn for “executive search” in Australia, my profile will appear at the top of the search results.

And if you search for “career coach” in Australia, my profile will again appear at the top of the list.

Please take a moment to do this search, putting “executive search” and “Australia” into an Advanced search (located at the right of the search bar at the top of the LinkedIn page). As you’ll see, I am currently ranked No. 1 in Australia.

How to search-optimise your LinkedIn profile

web searchIn my previous article, I talked about the Zero Moment of Truth concept. I said that, as a job seeker, you need to carefully manage the first impression you create, by ensuring your LinkedIn profile does an excellent job of showcasing your experience.

I also reminded you that recruiters and companies are filling a lot of roles by searching the LinkedIn database.

So before someone can read your excellent profile, you need to ensure that it gets found.

It’s the same principle of search engine optimisation (SEO) that websites use to ensure they appear on page one of Google’s search results.

Here’s how it works.

Part 3 – How publishing on LinkedIn could help secure your next role

Vintage typewriter on old bookby Brand Strategist & guest writer Wendy Pavey

 

In the first two articles in this series, I advocated publishing on LinkedIn as a powerful way to increase your visibility and influence recruiters, and I provided a three-step process to develop your first article.

Here’s my process for closing the circle from publishing to job offer.

We’ll assume that you have followed the advice in the previous articles and:

  • developed a personal brand that’s built around your ability to create value for an employer (and we’ll also assume that your LinkedIn profile supports this branding)
  • written an article that is aligned with this brand value
  • had your article edited, or at least proofread.

Why the Zero Moment of Truth is vital to your job search

Shining arbitrary light bulb on orangeHave you read  Winning the Zero Moment of Truth by Google’s Jim Lecinski? I highly recommend you do.

You might think it’s an odd choice for an executive recruiter to recommend to job seekers. Here’s why this book – and its compelling message – is a really valuable aid in your job search.

I’ve written before about why job ads have disappeared to make you aware that the majority (some say 90%) of jobs are now filled by recruiters and companies searching the LinkedIn database to find their preferred candidates.

How you can grow your professional network from 70 to 400 in 30 days

In my work aCartoon version of social networks an executive recruiter and career coach, I frequently counsel my coaching clients on proactive steps they can take to speed up the process of finding a new position.

Tapping into your existing network can be a valuable way to learn about potential new roles. Every day, for all sorts of reasons, there are changes at a company that could result in a job opening. Getting the “inside running” on that opening can give you a huge advantage.

In fact, it’s been my experience that the majority of jobs have always been filled in more informal ways.

Why companies don’t advertise jobs anymore

Blog 1I’ve worked in the executive recruitment space for more than 12 years now, identifying and engaging C-suite and senior management employees for my clients.

In this time I’ve worked with thousands of candidates and I’m often asked “where did all the job advertisements go?!”

If you’re in the job market right now – or think you soon might be – you need to understand exactly why and how the job market has changed.

How publishing on LinkedIn could help secure your next role – Part 2

Copy of New Picture (2)by Brand Strategist Wendy Pavey*

In the previous article in this series, I discussed how executives who are looking for a new role can publish on LinkedIn to demonstrate knowledge, prove credibility and get noticed.

Publishing can powerfully showcase your knowledge to recruiters, HRs and to key people at your employers of choice, leading straight to a job offer.

Here’s my three step process to developing compelling content that facilitates this.

How publishing on LinkedIn could help secure your next role – Part 1

blog imageby Brand Strategist Wendy Pavey*

Executives who are looking for a new role can take advantage of LinkedIn’s open publishing platform to quickly raise their profile in front of the right people and turbo-charge their outreach to employers of choice, helping to secure their next role.

Publishing articles is a simple but powerful way to demonstrate your knowledge, prove your credibility and get noticed.

Here’s how.