Insights

Workplace of the future & employment options

Richard was recently invited by the UQ Business School to speak with the MBA students about the workplace of the future and  employment options. UQ Business School has kindly allowed us to share their recording of this presentation. If you do have any questions or comments please don’t hesitate to contact Richard on

Email: richardt@areteexecutive.com.au

We hope you enjoy this presentation.

All I want for Christmas… is a new job!

xmas

Many of us arrive at the festive season wondering how the year has flown by so quickly. Between our work commitments and our everyday world of family we hit the end of year with a sudden thud!

The year has got away from us yet again. Many make a new years’ resolution that they will not continue with the pace of the previous year or will change companies or seek a promotion. The reality is that for a large percentage the change doesn’t come. We get stuck in the cycle and continue as we have done the previous year.

10 Ways to Conquer your Interview Fears

girl power super hero confidence in kids or children

girl power super hero confidence in kids or children

One of the most challenging processes for any candidate is the interview. So many of our executive candidates say “I haven’t been in a formal interview for over 10 years, what do I need to do to ensure I don’t stuff up?”

Headhunting – If you want the best talent, it’s essential

I facilitated a workshop on Performance-based Hiring last week for a new client. For the last 11 years, I have been a passionate user of this methodology created by Lou Adler. Lou is an engineer who moved into executive search and created a methodology designed to attract and engage with the best talent in the market place, not just the best talent that apply to a job advertisement.

One of the statistics I was able to source from www.seek.com.au states that 27% of full and part time employees in Australia are settled in their job;  27% are actively seeking a new job and 46% are monitoring the market.

Sell me don’t Tell me!

I find it hard to sell myself.

I know I’m good at what I do, but sales – it’s just not me.

I cannot tell you how many times I’ve heard this from candidates, highly accomplished individuals who have been paid handsomely to do what they do! However when they find themselves looking for a new role whether because of redundancy or choice they find it hard to sell themselves in their resume, LinkedIn profile and in an interview.

Today I want to focus on selling yourself in your resume. I’ve been reviewing a substantial number of senior finance resumes today and in general I have to HUNT for information about what the candidates have done in their past roles. Candidates have a tendency to think a recruiter wants to read their position description.

The thought of networking makes me sick!

 

Talking with a coaching client last week we were strategising ways they could aim to meet their potential employers of choice. I started asking about their industry networking events and they turned to me and said…

“The thought of networking makes me sick! Walking into a room of people I probably don’t know and coming up with small talk is worse than going to the dentist!”

Having coached hundreds of executives on getting their next career opportunity or board role this comment is not uncommon. However as an executive the art of networking is one that you need to conquer as there will be many situations where you need to make small talk and try and engage with complete strangers.

Networking does come more naturally to some more than others. So how can we make it less painful and more enjoyable?

Paul Grainger – CEO – The Brisbane Club

0c8aaa0Paul Grainger CEO The Brisbane Club Reflects on a Career in the Hospitality Industry & Talks the Importance of Having a Thick Skin and Fine Sense of Humour.

Paul Grainger is CEO of The Brisbane Club, one of Australia’s premier private clubs with a tradition of excellence since 1903. The Brisbane Club is home to over 2200 local, international and interstate members from the professional and business industries. Paul is currently responsible for the operation and strategic direction of the club, reporting to a board of directors. It’s a role Paul approaches with commitment and passion, he is someone who thrives on responsibility and who has dedicated his entire professional life to working within the hospitality space. He has some excellent insights about the unique challenges and rewards of working in the industry, which he shares on the Arete podcast.

Build your profile to build your business brand

Guest blogger Linzi Boyd discusses buidling your personal profile to build your business brand.

Brand famous imageWhile the importance of brand is becoming well understood by business leaders, we believe there’s more to it than simply ‘brand’ alone. We’ve identified three key pillars to help clients jump their businesses smoothly: brand, people and purpose.

Why build your profile into an asset?

In this article I’m concentrating on the ‘people’ aspect of brand because in the digital era ‘people’ has become as important, if not more so, than ‘brand’. Why? Because the new school way of doing business is ‘people buy from people’. Customers, in particular, want to see the people and culture behind a brand and to trust in the business’s authenticity.

New Financial Year Update

BAS Boardroom April BNE40894As we launch into the new financial year  Arete Executive is enjoying a very busy period, both in terms of our executive recruitment services, and also our career coaching and advocacy.  In my discussions with CEOs and Chairs, the job market in South East Queensland still seems to be slower than in Sydney and Melbourne.  That said, there is still a reasonable amount of hiring going on across most sectors other than Mining (which remains fairly stagnant from a recruitment perspective).

Why you should never use LinkedIn’s default connection reques

A key element of the enormous value of LinkedIn is that it provides you with a platform for a targeted job search.

Ten years ago, it was much, much harder to find people who were working for your dream employer.

Today, you can find those people in a few seconds. LinkedIn gives you a means to contact them and begin to build a professional relationship.

But…you realise you’re not the only person who’s going to be contacting them, don’t you?

You realise they’re probably getting connection requests every day, right?

Especially if they work for a great company that lots of people would like to work for.

So it’s vital that your approach is as professional and engaging as possible.

Why you need to identify your Employers of Choice

I’ve often talked about the failings of the recruitment industry, despite the fact that I and many other good people strive for the highest standards of professionalism.

But we don’t talk enough about what candidates can do to be professional in their dealings with us.

When I’m working with job seekers – either as a career coaching client or as an applicant for a job I’m recruiting – I find it frustrating when they can’t identify their employers of choice.

It’s like asking someone what they want to eat, and they say “Anything will do.” That bugs me because I can’t pick up the phone and order ”anything” from my local takeaway. It also bugs me because it shows there’s no thought going into it.

And your career deserves lots of thought!

How to uncover the hidden job market using LinkedIn

Why does an executive recruiter like me write a book telling people how to “uncover the hidden job market” for themselves?

For two reasons.

One, I genuinely want to serve people. I’m very aware that recruitment is not well respected as an industry. Often, when I tell people I’m a recruiter, they can’t wait to share some awful experience they’ve had.

So I want to show that many recruiters are in fact caring professionals who treat clients and candidates with respect and integrity.

Two, I’m very aware that most people will not find their next role via a recruiter, even a good one.

That’s because only a small percentage of jobs are actually filled by recruiters.