Insights

Building a high performing team: lessons from our Commonwealth Games athletes

With today marking the start of the 2018 Commonwealth Games, we find ourselves reflecting on the lessons our competing athletes can teach us about high performing teams in the workplace. Striving for excellence both individually and together as a team, they demonstrate the amazing results that can be achieved when passionate, committed, and fully engaged individuals share a common purpose.

While the business benefits of a high performing team are obvious – greater productivity, profitability and performance – it can also give your employment brand a competitive edge, helping you attract and recruit the right talent even in a candidates market.

Here are four tips on building a culture of high-performance, to attract and retain the best candidates:

Create healthy competition

Healthy competition can have many benefits in the workplace. It pushes your team to be the best they can be, increasing innovation and performance while also providing opportunities to learn valuable skills and lessons along the way. It is through healthy competition that we evaluate our strengths and weaknesses, and develop the motivation to excel.

Healthy competition also boosts creativity; think of how much more creative a team can be when they are competing for a bonus or trying to win a client account. Ashley Merryman, the co-author of Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing, sums this up well, “Whether professional musicians or school children, studies have shown competition fuels creativity and even improves the quality of the work produced. More than that, the skills that make you a great competitor – such as a willingness to push boundaries, trust one’s instincts, problem-solve – those are the same skills needed for innovation.” 

How a regionally based leadership role can accelerate your career

When changing your career path or considering roles you have been headhunted for, it can be easy to play it safe and say no to opportunities that take you interstate or to more regional areas.

However, in a recent Forbes article it was said, One of the biggest job-search mistakes you can make is to play it safe. The more you look and sound like every other job seeker, the worse your job search experience will be.”

Taking the path less travelled can have big payoffs for your career. Here are four ways that saying “yes” to a regional leadership role can help you climb the ladder faster.

International Women’s Day: What advice would you give your younger self?

Observed since the early 1900’s, the theme for the 2018 International Women’s Day is #PressforProgress, no doubt due to the release of the World Economic Forums’ Global Gender Gap Report showing that it will take 217 years to close the gender parity gap.

To celebrate this important day, we sought advice from our network of female business leaders and previous podcast guests asking What advice would you give your younger self?” Spoiler alert – their advice is a must-read for all current/aspiring executives of all genders.

Get out of your comfort zone

Why you need to find the best candidate IN the market not ON the market

 

When seeking to fill an executive role it can be easy to fall into the trap of thinking that the best candidate is on the market actively seeking the position you need filled. While it can certainly work out that way in some cases, the truth is most of the time the best candidate is busy in the market doing what they do best.

To find the right person for the role, your recruitment process needs to go beyond passive advertising and move into the realm of executive search (often referred to as “headhunting”) where you actively seek out the best candidate.

Not convinced? Here are four reasons why you need to find the best candidate in the market not on the market.

New Year, New Career – 6 tips for the Executive seeking a career move

You’ve said goodbye to 2017, had a Christmas break and decided that 2018 will be the year of change. So, what can you do to ensure that you do have the best opportunity for a new career role?

First and foremost, realise now, more than ever, we have the tools at our disposal to get proactive, take control, “know more people” and open that hidden door to the next role.

1.    If you haven’t already done so, read Richard Triggs Book, “Uncover the Hidden Job Market, How to find and win your next Senior Executive role.”   

2.    When you apply to a job advertisement, it’s probably already too late. 

Seasons Greetings

Seasons Greetings from the Arete Executive Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Workplace of the future & employment options

Richard was recently invited by the UQ Business School to speak with the MBA students about the workplace of the future and  employment options. UQ Business School has kindly allowed us to share their recording of this presentation. If you do have any questions or comments please don’t hesitate to contact Richard on

Email: richardt@areteexecutive.com.au

We hope you enjoy this presentation.

All I want for Christmas… is a new job!

xmas

Many of us arrive at the festive season wondering how the year has flown by so quickly. Between our work commitments and our everyday world of family we hit the end of year with a sudden thud!

The year has got away from us yet again. Many make a new years’ resolution that they will not continue with the pace of the previous year or will change companies or seek a promotion. The reality is that for a large percentage the change doesn’t come. We get stuck in the cycle and continue as we have done the previous year.

10 Ways to Conquer your Interview Fears

girl power super hero confidence in kids or children

girl power super hero confidence in kids or children

One of the most challenging processes for any candidate is the interview. So many of our executive candidates say “I haven’t been in a formal interview for over 10 years, what do I need to do to ensure I don’t stuff up?”

Headhunting – If you want the best talent, it’s essential

I facilitated a workshop on Performance-based Hiring last week for a new client. For the last 11 years, I have been a passionate user of this methodology created by Lou Adler. Lou is an engineer who moved into executive search and created a methodology designed to attract and engage with the best talent in the market place, not just the best talent that apply to a job advertisement.

One of the statistics I was able to source from www.seek.com.au states that 27% of full and part time employees in Australia are settled in their job;  27% are actively seeking a new job and 46% are monitoring the market.

Sell me don’t Tell me!

I find it hard to sell myself.

I know I’m good at what I do, but sales – it’s just not me.

I cannot tell you how many times I’ve heard this from candidates, highly accomplished individuals who have been paid handsomely to do what they do! However when they find themselves looking for a new role whether because of redundancy or choice they find it hard to sell themselves in their resume, LinkedIn profile and in an interview.

Today I want to focus on selling yourself in your resume. I’ve been reviewing a substantial number of senior finance resumes today and in general I have to HUNT for information about what the candidates have done in their past roles. Candidates have a tendency to think a recruiter wants to read their position description.

The thought of networking makes me sick!

 

Talking with a coaching client last week we were strategising ways they could aim to meet their potential employers of choice. I started asking about their industry networking events and they turned to me and said…

“The thought of networking makes me sick! Walking into a room of people I probably don’t know and coming up with small talk is worse than going to the dentist!”

Having coached hundreds of executives on getting their next career opportunity or board role this comment is not uncommon. However as an executive the art of networking is one that you need to conquer as there will be many situations where you need to make small talk and try and engage with complete strangers.

Networking does come more naturally to some more than others. So how can we make it less painful and more enjoyable?

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