Insights

All I want for Christmas… is a new job!

xmas

Many of us arrive at the festive season wondering how the year has flown by so quickly. Between our work commitments and our everyday world of family we hit the end of year with a sudden thud!

The year has got away from us yet again. Many make a new years’ resolution that they will not continue with the pace of the previous year or will change companies or seek a promotion. The reality is that for a large percentage the change doesn’t come. We get stuck in the cycle and continue as we have done the previous year.

Why you need to identify your Employers of Choice

I’ve often talked about the failings of the recruitment industry, despite the fact that I and many other good people strive for the highest standards of professionalism.

But we don’t talk enough about what candidates can do to be professional in their dealings with us.

When I’m working with job seekers – either as a career coaching client or as an applicant for a job I’m recruiting – I find it frustrating when they can’t identify their employers of choice.

It’s like asking someone what they want to eat, and they say “Anything will do.” That bugs me because I can’t pick up the phone and order ”anything” from my local takeaway. It also bugs me because it shows there’s no thought going into it.

And your career deserves lots of thought!

How to uncover the hidden job market using LinkedIn

Why does an executive recruiter like me write a book telling people how to “uncover the hidden job market” for themselves?

For two reasons.

One, I genuinely want to serve people. I’m very aware that recruitment is not well respected as an industry. Often, when I tell people I’m a recruiter, they can’t wait to share some awful experience they’ve had.

So I want to show that many recruiters are in fact caring professionals who treat clients and candidates with respect and integrity.

Two, I’m very aware that most people will not find their next role via a recruiter, even a good one.

That’s because only a small percentage of jobs are actually filled by recruiters.

How LinkedIn can build your confidence for job searching

In my career coaching practice, I frequently work with people who are not currently employed.

This has come about for all sorts of reasons. They may have been made redundant due to a contracting industry, difficult economic conditions or a change in company direction.

They may have taken a voluntary redundancy, sometimes cashing in a payout to fund a new business.

They might have had to relocate for family reasons, away from their previous employer.

They may have been terminated. The common thread is that being unemployed is a really difficult situation.

We are conditioned to value ourselves based on our career success, which sets us up for struggle when our career isn’t going well.

And of course, we’re in a world where we need to earn money to support ourselves and our loved ones.

How to Uncover the Hidden Job Market Using LinkedIn

Businessman using binoculars, people portraits in the lens

Why does an executive recruiter like me write a book telling people how to “uncover the hidden job market” for themselves?

For two reasons.

One, I genuinely want to serve people. I’m very aware that recruitment is not well respected as an industry. Often, when I tell people I’m a recruiter, they can’t wait to share some awful experience they’ve had.

So I want to show that many recruiters are in fact caring professionals who treat clients and candidates with respect and integrity.

Endorsements Rule!

ENDORSEDWhy you should be Endorsing people on LinkedIn

I’ve talked a lot about search-optimising your profile recently, and in my last article I mentioned the area of LinkedIn Endorsements.

I understand that many people don’t like these Endorsements, mainly because anyone who is connected to you can endorse you for a skill.

Regardless of whether they’ve ever worked with you or you’ve done work for them.

That does seem to devalue the whole thing.

But I’ve actually changed my mind about the overall value of Endorsements.

And I want to encourage you to give them.

Why I rank No. 1 in Australia on LinkedIn

number 1In my previous article, I wrote about how to search-optimise your LinkedIn profile, to make sure you are found when recruiters are searching to fill an unadvertised role.

I want to give you an example of this in action, so you can understand how to apply these principles for yourself.

If you search on LinkedIn for “executive search” in Australia, my profile will appear at the top of the search results.

And if you search for “career coach” in Australia, my profile will again appear at the top of the list.

Please take a moment to do this search, putting “executive search” and “Australia” into an Advanced search (located at the right of the search bar at the top of the LinkedIn page). As you’ll see, I am currently ranked No. 1 in Australia.

Wanted – Executive Candidates

Join our teamAfter nearly 15 years in recruitment I would like to think I can write a pretty good job ad.  “Position the organisation, sell the job and describe what’s in it for the candidate” – It may sound easy but so many are doing it wrong.

How do I know this?

Every 6 weeks for the past 18 months Richard Triggs and I have run our “Always Stand Out” workshop somewhere.  At every event we have 25 to 50 senior managers and executives (CEO’s, CFO’s, COO’s, GM’s, NED’s) keen to understand the changing marketplace, LinkedIn and how to uncover the hidden job market.

Why the Zero Moment of Truth is vital to your job search

Shining arbitrary light bulb on orangeHave you read  Winning the Zero Moment of Truth by Google’s Jim Lecinski? I highly recommend you do.

You might think it’s an odd choice for an executive recruiter to recommend to job seekers. Here’s why this book – and its compelling message – is a really valuable aid in your job search.

I’ve written before about why job ads have disappeared to make you aware that the majority (some say 90%) of jobs are now filled by recruiters and companies searching the LinkedIn database to find their preferred candidates.

Why recruiters won’t help you find your next job

businessman looking to falling question marks

In my previous article about how to decide your next career move, I introduced the concept of the four quadrants of the job market.

Here’s the diagram again.

job quadrantI suggested that your career planning should involve you exploring all the possibilities of Quadrants Two, Three and Four. I want you to give careful thought to what other roles you could do within your current industry; and what other industries you could bring value to.

This is all about transferable skills and it’s really valuable for you to be able to demonstrate HOW your experience can transfer into other roles and into other industries

How to decide your next career move

New Career

When I first sit down with a new career coaching client, I always start by asking “What’s your job of choice and who’s your employer of choice?”

I ask this for two reasons.

One, I really want to make sure that I steer my client into their dream role. I don’t want them to take any old job. I want them to be in the role where they can bring the most value.

How you can grow your professional network from 70 to 400 in 30 days

In my work aCartoon version of social networks an executive recruiter and career coach, I frequently counsel my coaching clients on proactive steps they can take to speed up the process of finding a new position.

Tapping into your existing network can be a valuable way to learn about potential new roles. Every day, for all sorts of reasons, there are changes at a company that could result in a job opening. Getting the “inside running” on that opening can give you a huge advantage.

In fact, it’s been my experience that the majority of jobs have always been filled in more informal ways.

Why companies don’t advertise jobs anymore

Blog 1I’ve worked in the executive recruitment space for more than 12 years now, identifying and engaging C-suite and senior management employees for my clients.

In this time I’ve worked with thousands of candidates and I’m often asked “where did all the job advertisements go?!”

If you’re in the job market right now – or think you soon might be – you need to understand exactly why and how the job market has changed.